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Porthole Mirror

£354.00

1950’s SALAVAGED PORTHOLE MIRROR

In stock

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Product Description

SALVAGED SHIPS OPENING PORTHOLE WINDOR MIRROR

STUNNING SOLID POLISHED ALUMINIUM, ORIGINAL RECLAIMED SHIPS PORTHOLE WITH TWO OR FOUR OPENING KEY SCREWS AND TEAK BACKING. PROFESSIONALLY POLISHED WITH NEW MIRROR GLASS

No reproduction ships porthole can replicate the character and impact of the genuine article. This ships porthole is as genuine as it gets. The solid screw eyes are working and look magnificent against the industrial polished aluminium.

The mirror is much more dramatic in reality than the pictures can illustrate. The chunky metal bolts and huge oversized hinge make this mirror a real statement.

Professionally stripped, polished and converted into elegant, practical pieces. This piece combines elegant nautical style with the functionality of a mirror creating a one off striking piece of reclaimed history. The mirror reflects light and space in any room and the fully functioning key screws of the portholes add drama and interest to your decor.

The metal is highly polished solid aluminium and the backing is ships teak wood with a fixing attached..

This mirror is available in different sizes. The one picured is the 19inch version.

TYPE 1 –  570MM X 720MM OVERALL / 450MM X 600MM MIRROR / 14KGS

TYPE 2 –  530MM X 600MM OVERALL / 410MM X 570MM MIRROR / 13KGS

KEYS 140MM / 5.5″

Unique finds have secured a wide range of portholes in various shapes and sizes, please contact us for more info.

The maritime word ‘Porthole’ originated during the reign of Henry VI of England (1485). King Henry mounted guns far too large for his ships and therefore the conventional methods of securing the weapons on the bow and stern were impossible.

A French shipbuilder named James Baker was commissioned to solve the problem: by piercing the ship’s sides so the cannons could be mounted inside. Circular covers were fitted for heavy weather and when the cannons were not in use.

The origin of word ‘Porthole’ has no actual link with the nautical terms of ‘Port’ and ‘Starboard’ but from the French word ‘Porte’ meaning ‘Door’.

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